Football gets its Hawkeye

January 8, 2018
WG Grace
This week, football’s new video assessment system reaches cup competitions in England. Will we learn from experiences in other sports?
Technology was accepted for lines-calls in tennis some years ago. It has also been introduced into cricket, and Rugby (both codes). LWD followed the emergence of Hawkeye in tennis, and one post has been studied as a business leadership case.
The changes were mostly accepted, perhaps grudgingly from those with a yearning for the romance of earlier days. Football now seems likely to follow a similar trajectory of initial controversy followed by eventual acceptance. There will almost certainly be learning from experience.
The new football system has been tested in Italy for around a hundred matches. It seems that the video referee is called into action in about 25% of matches. This is in contrast to the approach followed by rugby, when the hold-ups are incessant, and where referees are now conditioned to check every possible infringement,or point-scoring opportunity.
Tennis and cricket have opted for a limited number of player appeals. The approaches has been linked to spectator involvement following the game on large viewing screens, and rather naff graphics in cricket.
The problem I see is a concern by official bodies to obtain the ‘technically correct’ decision. This may be influenced by the financial swings hanging on a single decision.  In tennis, this means the evidence for a ball being hit in (including on) the line, or outside the line. The technology tends to be trusted to a precision that is not possible for the human eye of even the best umpires. A similar state of affairs holds in cricket where the technology reveals the slightest of contact with ball on bat, which would influence a decision for caught or LBW (out for the ball striking the player’s pads according to complex rules known as leg before wicket).
The current systems reduce uncertainties of human error to plausible ‘right or wrong’ decisions.  We are not quite at the limits of uncertainty according to the scientific principle formulated by Heisenberg, but not precise enough to make practical debate futile.
A better way?
There is a modification to this approach which seems better to me. The technology could be used to avoid obvious errors, rather than resolve minuscule quibbles over the slightest of touches of a ball on a bat, or whether  a ball has gone beyond the line (of a football or tennis playing area , or marginally forward in a passing sequence in rugby (one of the game’s delights cut short too often at present.)
Will the new system being introduced resolve controversy about decisions by the officials? Not according to one Italian expert describing their footballing experience. Are the fans happy? Only if the decision is in their team’s favour, he replied with a sigh.

Can a leader be one of the boys or if female one of the girls?

February 19, 2017

joe_root_training

This week, England announced Joe Root as the new cricket captain. Hours after the appointment the question was raised. Will he have to change his behaviour from being ‘just one of the boys?’

To avoid accusations of gender-blindness, I will note that the general question is whether anyone from within a group has to change behaviour on becoming the group’s appointed leader, regardless of gender

The question applies to any leader who has not been ‘parachuted in’ to a position. As I thought about , I realised I am not sure whether most leaders are insiders or outsiders [I don’t know of any statistics, and informed suggestions are welcomed].

Succession processes and planning

Tribal succession has always passed on leadership to the recognised successor. When that is in dispute, claimants (‘pretenders’) have to sort out who gets the top job. It is a process that can lead to the bloodiest of conflicts.

In these enlightened times of rational management, succession planning is guided by experts in the field, and is followed by results that are sometimes bad, sometimes not so bad.

It is here that I see the succession process justifies the maxim that we get the leaders we deserve. In America, a long and bruising selection process resulted in the appointment of President Trump, about which I have written far too much already for my own state of mental equilibrium. It is in the succession process that I see justified the maxim that we get the leaders we deserve

It is in the succession process that I see justified the maxim that we get the leaders we deserve

The born leader

Within hours, the appointment was hailed as the inevitable one, with Joe Root being ‘a born leader’according to Yorkshire director of cricket Martyn Moxon.

Root, 26, takes over from Alastair Cook despite having led in only four first-class matches – three for Yorkshire and one for England Lions.

“He has always studied the game and different tactics throughout his career,” Moxon told BBC Radio 5 live.

“It’s not something that he is going to have to learn before his first Test. I’m sure he will do a good job.”

BBC Sport

This harks back to a fifty-year-old angels on a pinhead debate on whether leaders are born or made. After a lot of huffing and puffing, discussion has died down. There is a consensus that leaders who are appointed have no ‘necessary and sufficient’ characteristics, and that various patterns of effective leader behaviors suggest a mix of inherited and acquired (situational) traits.

On the other hand

Within hours, discussion began on whether Root’s chirpy young man style would be appropriate for the job as captain.

A subtler point was whether the team’s best batsman should be entrusted the captain’s job. Examples were for found of appointments which were followed by a higher rate of accumulation of runs per innings, sometimes by a lower one. To my surprise, the stats show that the majority of England captains performed better after receiving the captaincy. [Yes, I leave the deeper analysis of this to my readers]

Overall

On balance, the issue of leadership style seems a minor consideration. Captains in recent decades have varied from the introverted and predictable (Hussain, Atherton, and arguably Cook) to the impulsive (Petersen) and the obsessive (Boycott).

It will be interesting to see what reports leak out about Cook’s leadership style as England’s cricket fortunes ebb and flow, as they probably will over the next few years of his captaincy. (Unlike football managers, England Cricket captains with one or two exceptions have been given a ‘decent innings’ before being retired.

[Image, Wikipedia]


Wales v Japan: surrogate revenge against Jones the coach?

November 19, 2016
Wales rugby ball
Today there is a festival of sport to enjoy. One of the highlights in our household is the rugby match at the Millennium Stadium, where Wales take on Japan
 We are a mostly harmonious sport-watching household, with affiliations to Wales, Scotland, and more than a smidgen of affection for Ireland, and New Zealand after a blissful sabbatical at Christchurch, since much battered by dreadful earthquakes.
England v Australia
In far too early a start, the morning [Saturday 19 NOvember 2016] begins as England briefly promise  to rescue a hopeless situation against India, in Cricket. At lunch, as I write this post (6am GMT), they are still tantalizingly close to avoiding the following on (the humiliation forced on a test team outplayed by 200 runs in the first innings battle).
Man U v The Gunners
There are several fixture clashes. The afternoon starts with one of those crunch games in football, this one between Manchester United and Arsenal. A veritable nine pointer. (Sorry, three points to the winner.  Easy to get carried away).
Murray v Raonic v Djokovic  
Then overlapping events. Andy Murray sets out to reach the final of the Tennis World Championships, trying to hold on to his recent status as world No 1 singles player. His brother Jamie achieved to same lofty status, and not for the first time,  just a day ago in doubles. Later, Novak Djokovic also competes to win back his crown.
The battle may be resolved in a monumental clash tomorrow.
Wales v Japan at Rugby
And Wales play Japan at rugby. Until recently, this would have been regarded somewhat patronizingly in the land of my fathers.then there was the World Cup when Japan became everyone’s favourite second team for their courage and skill. Their coach  Eddie Jones was an instant celebrity. Was he Welsh, we wondered, before discerning that his Mum was Japanese. Maybe his Ozzie Dad had some Celtic blood from somewhere, Old rather than than New South Wales, perhaps? We had a captain once called Eddie (Butler).
The Jones boy goes From Hero to Villain
Then the reason for his fall from grace. He left his coaching appointment in Japan to become chief of an ailing England team.  Need I say more?  He began a run which currently stands as ten successive victories.  England are heading for the top in world rugby.  Wales may struggle against Japan.
At least, in the language of the wretched US presidential campaign, we have a surrogate to disapprove of, as the gallant Japanese run on to the green green grass of home.

George Osborne and Joe Root strengthen their cases as future national leaders

July 12, 2015

This week two leaders and their possible successors were tested. Alistair Cook opened the batting for England in Cardiff, and David Cameron started for the Government at Westminster

Here are my notes made at the time, [8th July 2015] which have been slightly edited for clarity purposes.

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The dilemmas of talent management. The case of Kevin Pietersen

May 13, 2015

KPIn the space of a week, Kevin Pietersen, cricket’s most talented and controversial figure, scored a record number of runs and learned that he would not be selected for the England test team

Great individual talent sometimes requires great talent management. Kevin Pietersen’s international cricket career is a prime example.

The English cricket establishment has since his arrival on the scene struggled with the challenge of harnessing the exceptional talent of Kevin Pietersen and dealing with assorted off-field controversies.

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The Incomparable Richie Benaud (1930-2015)

April 10, 2015

Baggy green capAfter a successful career as a cricketer, Richie Benaud gave pleasure to countless fans around the world for his affectionate and unique broadcasting style.

As he matured, his walnut-brown crumbled face to camera resembled an extension of the baggy-green cap as a symbol of Australian  cricket.

Towards the end of his life, he endured accidents and bad health stoically.

Obituaries this week made comparisons with other cricketers and commentators.  

He is ranked with his compatriot Bradman for influencing the success of Australian cricket. Similarities have been notedwith Mike Brearley for his  astute  captaincy, with John Arlott as a warm and empathic commentator, and with   Geoff Boycott, (without the spiky narcissism) as a reader of the game.

Comparisons may help a little in  our understanding of his achievements and facets of his personality.  They can do little more.  Richie Benaud the man remains incomparable.


England v Australia Cricket Preview: Boycott v Morgan

February 13, 2015

Eoin Morgan

A day before the start of the Cricket World Cup in Australia and New Zealand Geoffrey Boycott provides a typically dismissive critique of the competence of the recently appointed England captain Eoin Morgan

Morgan, according to Boycott is “not as good a batsman as he thinks he is”, adding that maybe he is not even as good a batsman as other people think he is (excluding the prescient Boycott, naturally).

Why?

It is not difficult to come up with an explanation for Boycott’s remarks. Since retiring from Cricket, he has become a successful commentator known for his portrayal of a stereotype forthright Yorkshire man, never slow to articulate his opinions on the stupidity of others who might be tempted to offer alternative views.

This is probably a matter of calculated style, honed on the sports after-dinner circuit, where a certain kind of blokeish humour is almost obligatory. The exceptions are those with the languidness of the privileged classes who dominate Cricket’s elite, and who remain among Geoffrey’s bitterest targets for scorn and abuse.

I don’t think Boycott chooses a target just in order to be controversial. He is often making an intelligent point in his well-crafted remarks. He is more than intelligent enough to realize that he himself is now patronized in a tokenistic and school-boyish way by his fellow-commentators who tend to refer to him as ‘Sir’ Geoffrey.

The run maker

Geoffrey Boycott broke countless records as an England opening batsman. His self-obsession also explains why is ranked among the most inept of captains, although there is much competition for that title.

As a batsman, Boycott was seen as a consummate accumulator of runs, placing his own average above any other consideration. He was tolerated by players and public rather than liked, grudgingly accepted for the occasions when his self-obsession worked to the team’s advantage.

The Captain

Unsurprisingly, Boycott thought he would make a jolly good captain of the England cricket team, better than the public school oiks who always got the nod over him. Unfortunately, the temperament that helped him accumulate all those runs did not serve him well as captain.

To borrow from his own words, Geoffrey was not as good a captain as he thought he would be, and maybe not even as good a captain as other people thought he would be.

Notes:

 Top Image is of Eoin Morgan, from Wikipedia, looking disturbingly like former England captain Alistair Cook, seen here, also from Wikipedia.Alistair Cook