Why is Rob Ford so popular? The question is relevant to politicians everywhere

November 6, 2013

Rob Ford, the Mayor of Toronto is made a figure of fun by his political enemies. Yet he remains popular, and his popularity has risen since he has accepted his use of hard and soft drugs among his other misdemeanours

Rob Ford could be written off as a one-off, an eccentric figure and a joke. His appearances in the media show a larger-than-life figure, an Archie Bunker goes to Washington character.

Another way of looking at it is evidence of the rejection of conventional values by a proportion of the electorate. One commentator suggests that at least some of his support comes from disillusioned electors who believe they have not been listened to by mainstream politicians.

Does that seem familiar?

It does to me. I remember covering the election of political ‘figures of fun’ in Brazil and Italy over the last few years. In Italy, earlier this year, the anti-politician Beppe Grillo won 25% of the vote running for President. In Brazil Tiririka, or Mr Grumpy, stood in the elections of 2010 and won election as a deputy on the slogan “things can only get worse”

The leaders we deserve

In a perverse way, these outcrops of the democratic process are a healthy reminder of the right of the people to opt for the leaders they deserve and reject the rhetoric of political orthodoxy. I find it at least as constructive as the case made by Russell Brand in a recent Newsnight interview [October 2013] to justify ‘revolution by not-voting’.

What’s going on?

I leave open the possibility that a vote for a figure of fun is actually a serious political statement.

An Archie Bunker moment

According to my urban dictionary, Archie Bunker is a slang word for crack or cocaine. Saying that you have some Archie Bunker is referring to the bigot Archie Bunker, which means your product is whiter then one of the whitest men in America.

Updated

Nov 8th. Rob Ford ‘may enter re-hab’


Rob Ford and Leaders We Deserve

November 2, 2013


Rob Ford is still mayor of Toronto as increasingly bizarre stories previously on the web escape into mainline media

Rob Ford makes an easy target for stories vilifying his lifestyle choices. They are accumulating in a way that aging commentators like myself may find reminiscent of the stories about Richard Nixon. History tells us that Nixon continued to deny his actions were illegal, as the evidence mounted that was eventually to impeach him.

The long-running background story of Rob Ford implies a leader struggling to maintain a facade of normality around incidents implying lack of control and involvement in substance abuse. Mr Ford as a target is all the easier for his numerous unflattering images which are now entering the wider public domaine.

Several accounts giving historical background of the Ford story have emerged. The Toronto Star has been a particular rich source of the breaking news.

I also like The Huffington Post story today [1st Nov 2013]

In June [2013], the day after police made the massive drug raids called Project Traveller, [Police chief] Blair said he would not comment on whether the police had seized any video of the mayor or whether he was under investigation.
But that was before an actual video of the mayor was recovered on Tuesday, taken from a hard drive seized during the Project Traveller raids on June 20.

On Thursday, [Nov 30st 2013] Blair said, “I think it’s fair to say the mayor is depicted in the video.”
He added: “I’m disappointed. As a citizen of Toronto, I’m disappointed…I know this this is a traumatic issue for the citizens of this city, for the reputation of this city and that concerns me.”

Will Ford resign?

From a distance, the Rob Ford drama appears heading for a sad conclusion. If I believed in tipping points, I would say the situation has tipped over irretrievably. Other commentators believe that this is a leader who will have to be forced from office rather than resign. This view was expressed in The Guardian a few hours after this post was published [2nd November 2013].

Update

Nov 4th 2013 In his weekly radio broadcast, The Mayor apologizes for his mistakes but avoids admission of any criminal wrongdoing, or intention of standing down.


Charlotte Hogg appointed hew Chief Operating Officer at the Bank of England

June 21, 2013

Charlotte Hogg, new COO of the Bank of EnglandMark Carney, the incoming governor, has appointed Charlotte Hogg as Chief Operating Officer of The Bank of England running all day-to-day management functions.

The news this week [June 19th 2013] suggests evidence of changes accompanying the arrival of the new governor of the Bank of England.

Whenever a banker is appointed or leaves, the public is avid for further evidence of the cupidity our financial leaders. In this case, the figures speak for themselves. She will work for the same salary, £260,000 salary p.a. and benefits as the Bank’s three deputy governors. Last year she is reported to have earned, with bonuses, £2.5m in her senior post in Santander

According to the BBC

Charlotte Hogg, who like Carney studied at Oxford and Harvard, started her career at the Bank before moving to McKinsey in Washington. She has also worked at Morgan Stanley, before joining Experian as head of its operations in the UK and Ireland.
Hogg is descended from one of Britain’s most high profile political families. Her mother is Baroness (Sarah) Hogg, a senior adviser to Sir John Major when he was prime minister. Her father is Viscount Hailsham, the former Tory cabinet minister Douglas Hogg, who gained notoriety when he stepped down as an MP after claiming £2,200 expenses for cleaning the moat at his 13th-century country estate. Her paternal grandfather was Lord Hailsham, a former lord chancellor. “You can have too much of a good thing in one family,” Hogg once told her local newspaper.

Paul Tucker, the Bank’s deputy governor for financial stability who lost out on the top job to Carney, announced his intention to leave the Bank last week. Prior to Charlotte Hogg, the most senior woman at the Bank was Rachel Lomax, who served as a deputy governor from 2003 to 2008.

One small step for Charlotte …?

November 2014

The move to redress inequality in top financial posts is likely to be of limited impact. The proportion of women entering the Economics profession remains low.


Should the National Hockey League Players Association (NHLPA) be responsible for player safety on the ice?

November 20, 2012

Guy H.J. Bourbonnière,
Director of Canadian Healthcare & Educational Markets, and Comprehensive & Energy Solutions,
Ingersoll Rand

During this spring’s Hockey playoffs, Phoenix Coyotes winger Raffi Torres applied a vicious hit to the head of star player Marian Hossa of the Chicago Hawks. The National Hockey League imposed a 25 game suspension, which was quickly appealed by the Players association. The case reveals some interesting dilemmas.

An odd assumption

The NHLPA is made up of athlete members and executive leaders with the mandate to represent the players of the National Hockey League (NHL) and to guarantee that their rights as players are upheld under the terms of the Collective Bargaining Agreement. One of the odd assumptions is the players expect the NHL to protect their association members from one other’s misdemeanors.

The new collective bargaining agreement

The NHLPA is in the news [October 2012] as players come together to negotiate a new collective bargaining agreement with the NHL. There is no mention of the recent on-ice assaults.

The dilemma that the NHLPA player leaders have, is that while they attempt to work together to improve the financial position and working conditions of players, they also compete against each other every time they play a hockey game.

The game is quick, violent and dangerous. Often players break the rules to inflict forms of intimidation against each other (i.e. fellow association members) to win a game.

In fact, the NHL has to put new measures in place regularly to deter fellow association members from hurting each other in both premeditated and spontaneous violent actions. It is a real irony that the NHL has to impose regulations to protect fellow association members from each other.

Sometimes simple, sometimes serious

These regulations may be as simple as penalizing a team and player for a short period of time by reducing the number of players they can have on the ice surface during play. In more serious cases, the player can be suspended for a number of games, and forfeit his pay for those games that he is suspended.

On a regular basis, the NHLPA appeals these suspensions to protect the rights of the offending player. I wonder how the victim of the assault feels when his own player’s association is defending his assaulter. It makes more sense that suspensions be doled out by the NHLPA instead of the NHL.
The most recent example was during this spring’s playoff where repeat offender Raffi Torres applied a vicious hit to the head of star player Marian Hossa. The National Hockey League imposed a 25 game suspension which was quickly appealed by the NHLPA.

‘Who owns the problem?’

The NHLPA should re-write the charter on what constitutes a member in good standing, to include respect for their fellow members. Using their fists or sticks as weapons against each other should not be tolerated by the NHLPA. The NHLPA should not expect the NHL to have to protect players from each other.

Lindsay’s legacy

The NHLPA was formed by a heroic leader (and player) named Ted Lindsay (Duff, 2008). He formed the original NHLPA at a time when it was easy for owners to ostracize players who confronted the owners. It is now the time for a new heroic leader to come forward and move beyond the paradigm of a players’ association as a unified front vs. team owners. The players are extremely well-paid and are working under good labour conditions. The people who are hurting them and shortening their careers through assaults on the ice, are fellow members. An enhanced mandate of the NHLPA should include the enforcement of appropriate on-ice behavior and remove players who choose not to comply.

To go more deeply

Duff, B. (2008) Seven: A Salute to Ted Lindsay.1st ed. Olympia Entertainment
Kelly, M. (2012) Raffi Torres suspended 25 games by NHL for Hossa hit: Apr 21, 2012. Available at:
http://www.cbc.ca/sports/hockey/nhl/story/2012/04/21/sp-raffi-torres-suspension.html (Accessed: 15 August 2012)
Ross, A. (2010) ‘Trust and Antitrust: The Failure of the First National Hockey League Players’ Association, 1957-1958’, University of Guelph
Available at: http://uoguelph.academia.edu/JAndrewRoss/Papers/480136/Trust_and_Antitrust_The_Failure_of_the_First_National_Hockey_League_Players_Association_1957_-1958
(Accessed: 26 July 2012)
The Canadian Press. (2012) NHL reduces Raffi Torres suspension by four games, Available at: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/sports/hockey/nhl-reduces-raffi-torres-suspension-by-four-games/article4384878/ (Accessed: 15 August 2012)
CONSTITUTION OF THE NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE PLAYERS’ ASSOCIATION [Online]. Available at: http://www.nhlpa.com/docs/about-us/nhlpa_constitution.pdf
2011-12 Official NHL Rulebook [Online]. Available at: http://www.nhl.com/nhl/en/v3/ext/pdfs/2011-12_RULE_BOOK.pdf

Image from

4.bp.blogspot.com