Transactional Analysis: Michael Gove and Sam Curren

 

Saturday 14 September, 2019

Michael Gove is a frequent flyer on Brexit airlines, with a role of communicating how the journey to Brexitland’s main runway is progressing. He is all you would expect of a fully trained flight steward. Reassuring, confident, earnest, fluent…

And yet…

There something deeper behind the public performances of this ambitious politician.
What might it be? I mused.
A thought came to me while listening to two sports journalists this morning. They were discussing the brilliant bowling displays of Joffra Archer and Sam Curran yesterday, playing for England against Australia.
Archer has already become the latest hurricane-fast bowler in test cricket. His life-threatening deliveries have had more effect on the world No 1 batsman Stephen Smith than all the other plodders in the England team. Yesterday his six wickets reduced Australia to a losing position that even Smith was unable to buttress.
The commentators gave Archer due respect for another game-changing performance.
‘But we mustn’t forget Sam Curran,’ the first pundit says, ‘he bowled as well as anyone.’
‘He also brings so much freshness and youthful energy to the team’ say the other. ‘When he had those two lbw appeals turned down he looked like a little boy who hadn’t had the birthday present he was expecting.’
What, you may be thinking, has that to do with Brexit and Michael Gove? I am coming to that. The cricketing anecdote puts me into sense-making mode. A venerable form of analysis comes to mind. Personal interactions can be examined as exchanges between three states of mind, parental, adult, or child. The descriptions of Young Sam sound pretty much like parent to parent (nurturing sub-category) exchanges.
Why not adult to adult? Because That would sound more like a conversation continuing: ‘He showed his disappointment when his appeals were turned down.’
‘Yes, he would have taken the wicket of Steve Smith, which could have changed the course of the game.’
Now back to Brexit Airlines. Michael Gove is constantly operating in grown-up mode. In public, he speaks as one adult to another. This week he said ‘Our preparations for exiting the EU are satisfactory. No one will be deprived of any medicines they require.’

The concealed message

Now for the next bit of the transactional analysis. A message often has another and concealed meaning. Michael may well be playing a game, saying one thing while concealing another.
His concealed message may be ‘there, there, don’t bother yourself with all that, daddy will see everything will be alright in the end’ which seems to me more like a parent to child transaction. These transactions often often induce parent child reactions (‘don’t talk to me like that’).

Other explanations are possible

Other explanations are also possible. As one fictional politician remarked, ‘you may say that, I couldn’t possibly comment.’

One Response to Transactional Analysis: Michael Gove and Sam Curren

  1. Dina says:

    Dear Tudor, admire your attempt to try to make sense of all that chaos. When it comes to Michael Gove narcissistic socio/psychopath comes to mind.

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