A tale of two Harrys: Or is it Much Ado about Nothing?

February 9, 2012

Two Harrys have dominated headlines in the UK this week. Prince Harry’s planned assignment to the Falkland Islands, and Harry Redknapp’s successful case against tax dodging to become favourite to become England’s football manager

SPOILER ALERT

The following story is robbed of much of its interest after the author discovered it was Prince Wills not Prince Harry who has taken up arms to defend the Falklands. [Thanks to subscriber S.M. for pointing this out. Harry has won his spurs but is still preparing for his next battle].

Anyway, on with the dubious post:

There’s not much linking the two stories, except perhaps an echo of one of Shakespeare’s patriotic lines Cry God For Harry England and St George.

Act the first

Prince Harry Windsor is summoned to serve his country and fly into battle in the distant Isles of the Falklands, long disputed by the Spanish foes (well, Argentina now). He accompanies a mighty battle-force, fresh raised. What a furore. The self-styled pretender to the Malvinas cries that the English are planning for war.

Act the second

Meanwhile Harry Redknapp, grand knight of the Hotspur lineage, was facing foul charges of robbing the Queen’s revenues, and secreting his ill-gotten gains abroad. As Prince Harry prepares his famed battle-charger for action, Hotspur is reprieved. He walks free to the acclaim of his faithful followers.

Act the third

The doughty warrior Sir Terry of the three Lions is brought low by words he may or may not have said. Lord Capello, the foreign-born king of the nation’s jousting forces, attempts in vain to save Sir Terry but is forced to fall on his sword.

Act the forth

Harry Hotspur hears the calls from his followers to take the crown from the fallen Capello. The Queen of all the Malvinas renames her countries after a famed warrior and craft which perished in the seas fighting to retrieve them from the English forces.

Act five

How will this end? Is it a triumph for one or both Harrys, or much ado about nothing.