Why did Mike Ashley sack Chris Hughton?

Some leadership stories are simpler than others. The departure of the Newcastle United manager this week seems sad but relatively uncomplicated to explain. But there may be possibilities beyond the most widely-accepted explanation

There has been wider-than-usual condemnation of the abrupt removal of Chris Hughton from his post as manager of Newcastle and his replacement with Alan Pardue. The consensus was high among footballers, pundits, fans, and fellow managers.

The popular story runs as follows

[1] The owner Mike Ashley has ‘previous form’ for ill-judged and hasty decisions in hiring and firing managers.
[2] This dismissal follows a pattern.
[3] It is ill-judged this time because Hughton had done an admirable job in the rescue of the club from relegation from the Premier league (a decline itself widely attributed in part to its dubious governance under Mr Ashley).
[4] The revival this season in the Premiership was better than expected even by fans. A relatively brief run of poor results recently has still left the club close to the middle of the Premiership table.
[5] Chris Hughton is widely admired as a capable manager.
[6] Claims that his replacement, Alan Pardue, will bring an experience which would strengthen NUFC’s future are unconvincing.

Chorus of disapproval

Among this chorus of disapproval, one voice offered some justification for the owner’s decision The Guardian suggested that:

Maybe, just maybe, Ashley will get this one right. Hughton was popular with the players but not so popular, apparently, that the team felt like breaking sweat at West Bromwich Albion last weekend, when Newcastle did not so much have an off day as a day off. A manager should never be one of the boys because boys occasionally play truant. Newcastle’s record since Hughton brought them back to the Premier League has been surprisingly good…yet impressive performances against Aston Villa, Sunderland, Arsenal and Chelsea have been offset by losing at home to Blackpool, Stoke and Blackburn. It seems that under Hughton, Newcastle were up for some fixtures but not others, a bit like Middlesbrough under Gareth Southgate. Christmas departures are sad but not necessarily bad.

The Guardian analysis differs from the widely espoused view that Newcastle are cursed with a particularly stupid Chairman who fails to see what is obvious to almost everyone with an opinion on the matter.

Other possibilities

There are other possibilities. Mr Ashley has in the past revealed an emotionality in his leadership style. His actions may have repeatedly influenced by irrational feelings of frustration and a failure to win the approval of the Newcastle faithful.

Or maybe, and I find this rather convincing, the owner is an entrepreneur who was successful in earlier business dealings. He may well be pursuing an entrepreneurial strategy for preparing the club for his exit at as good a price as he can obtain. In which case, the sacking may not necessarily be bad for Mr Ashley. As for Newcastle Football Club? New ownership may also ‘may not necessarily be bad’ for the club.

“If you always do…”

The team turned in one of their best performances of the season a few day’s after Pardue’e appointment [Saturday 11th December]. A new dawn? More systems-oriented fans may feel that “If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you always got.”

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